Sorokin interview, California Daily Bruin (1937)

 

‘Sorokin Tells about Students, Professors, Preferences’ – California Daily Bruin 7-2-1937

 

Posted here as a PDF file is the following article:

Sorokin Tells about Students, Professors, Preferences

By Barbara Hirshfeld

California Daily Bruin

July 2, 1937

pp. 1, 4

Sorokin was teaching a summer session course at the University of California at Los Angeles. The interview gives a warm, lighthearted view of Sorkin as person.

 

posted by Roger W. Smith

     August 2021

Sorokin Hits Colleges as “Ph.D. Factories”

 

‘Sorokin Hits Colleges as Ph.D. Factories’ – Boston Sunday Post 1-10-1954

‘Sorokin Hits Colleges as Ph.D. Factories’ – Boston Sunday Post 1-10-1954

 

Posted here both as a PDF file and as a Word document is the following article:

Sorokin Hits Colleges as “Ph.D. Factories”

Boston Sunday Post

January 10, 1954

pp. 33, 42

The article gives perspective on Sorokin’s pedagogical views. The book he mentions being currently at work on was apparently Fads and Foibles in Modern Sociology and Related Sciences.

 

posted by Roger W. Smith

     August 2021

“An Expert’s Opinion of Russia of the Present” (The Michigan Alumnus)

 

‘An Expert’s Opinion of Russia of the Present’ – Michigan Alumnus 5-8-1924

 

‘An Expert’s Opinion of Russia of the Present’ – Michigan Alumnus 5-8-1924

 

Posted here:

An Expert’s Opinion of Russia of the Present

Visiting Russian Professor Grant Interesting Interview to Alumnus

The Michigan Alumnus

May 8, 1924

pp. 884-886

“Forecasts Early Bolshevik Collapse”

 

‘Forecasts Early Bolshevik Collapse’ – New York Evening Post 11-16-1923

 

Posted here (downloadable Word document above) is the following:

Forecasts Early Bolshevik Collapse

Ex-Professor of Sociology In Petrograd Predicts Democracy for Russia

New York Evening Post

November 16. 1923

 

This article seems to be unknown to Sorokin scholars — it is not listed in any bibliography or biographical work on Sorokin, as far as I know.

When the Post article appeared, Sorokin had been in the US for only about six weeks and was visiting, as a guest, Vassar College, where he attended classes, would soon give lectures on the Russian revolution to Vassar students, and worked on improving his English.

 

posted by Roger W. Smith

     August 2021

 

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See also my post:

Sorokin on The Living Church of Russia (Живая Церковь), Christian Advocate, 1923

Sorokin on The Living Church of Russia (Живая Церковь), Christian Advocate, 1923

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“Professor Sorokine To Remain in U.S.”

 

 

Professor Sorokine To Remain in U.S.

 

The present Russian government has extended a formal invitation to Professor Pitirim Sorokine, who is a guest of President [Henry Noble] MacCracken at Vassar College at present, to return to that country and take up once more the editorship of the Russian Peasant Magazine, which he carried on before his condemnation.

Professor Sorokine says that he is not planning to accept this invitation because he believes that a faction would have him arrested if he refused to subscribe to their opinions. In addition he would be obliged to aid in the public instruction under the communist government, which would not be pleasant. He said Wednesday:

“If the imprisonment of Trotsky by the communists, announced today, is true, I believe that the present Russian government is doomed and that its fall will take place in a short time.”

 

Poughkeepsie Eagle-News (Poughkeepsie, New York), January 17, 1924, pg. 6

“Mrs. Pitirim Sorokine on Way to This Country Now”

 

 

Those who became friends of Dr. Pitirim Sorokine during his brief stay in Decatur Friday will be interested to know that he left for New York that evening to meet Mrs. Sorokine, who is coming on a steamship [the Belgenland from Cherbourg, France; it arrived in New York City on March 28, 1924] from Russia within the next day or two. Dr. Sorokine was banished from Russia two years ago. and this will be their first meeting since that time. *

Mrs. Sorokine, like her husband, is a member of the intelligentsia. She is a botanist of considerable reputation.

While in this country. Dr. Sorokine has been seeing to the publication of a book by the Dutton Co., and now has another in preparation, to be brought out by Lippincott’s under the editorship of Dr. [Edward C.] Hayes of the University of Illinois. In addition, he is doing considerable lecturing. He expects to be at the University of Missouri before long, and to pass the summer with Mrs. Sorokine, at the University of Minnesota.

 

— Mrs. Pitirim Sorokine on Way to This Country Now,” The Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois), Sunday, March 23, 1924, pg. 17

 

* This was not accurate, since the Sorokins emigrated together from Russia upon Pitirim Sorokin’s expulsion and settled together in Prague before Pitirim Sorokin left Czechoslovakia for the United States. And, when Sorokin made his visit, he had not made a decision, at that time, not to return to Czechoslovakia. Over time, his reception in the United States, among other considerations, induced him to remain there. The Sorokins became U.S. citizens in 1930, when they were residing in Minnesota.

 

 

 

 

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Elena Petrovna Sorokina (née Baratynskaya; 1894–1975) was, as noted above, a botanist. Her scientific papers were published under the name Helen P. Sorokin.

 

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

   May 2019

“Dr. Sorokine Is Guest of English Club at Luncheon” (an early glimpse of Sorokin the exile)

 

 

Dr. Pitirim Sorokine, professor in the University of Petrograd, who spoke twice in Millikin auditorium Friday, was guest of honor at a luncheon in the Yellow Lantern at 12:30, given by the English club of the university.

Following luncheon, Dr. Sorokine spoke briefly and humorously on his personal experiences. He characterized himself as the son of a Russian laborer and of the daughter of a peasant, and said his experiences therefore were not the experiences of the nobility; that, in fact, he knew nothing of that side of Russian life.

He had what is apparently the fate of all educated Russians. He was condemned to death, but escaped and went to Prague on the invitation of President Masaryk of Czechoslovakia, a personal friend of Dr. Sorokine’s. He remained there 11 months, and then came to America, where he declares he thinks he will stay.

“I have always been an admirer of your country,” he said, “more so than ever now that I know you intimately instead of from across the sea. I was glad when some of your universities asked me to come to speak to their classes.”

Dr. Sorokine is the house guest of Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Smith while in Decatur.

 

— “Dr. Sorokine Is Guest of English Club at Luncheon; Millikin Lecturer Being Entertained in W. W. Smith Home.” Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois), Saturday, March 22, 1924, pg. 8

 

 

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Millikin University is a private university in Decatur, Illinois. It was founded in 1901 by prominent Decatur businessman James Millikin and is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA).

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

   May 2019

 

“Almost Any Catastrophe Would Fit Into Harvard Professor’s Thesis”

 

 

‘almost any catastrophe would fit into Harvard’ prof’s thesis’ – Balt Sun 10-2-1935

 

 

He Told Us So

Almost Any Catastrophe Would Fit Into Harvard Professor’s Thesis

By U. P. Ives

The Baltimore Sun, October 2, 1939, pg. 8

 

 

Full article posted above as a downloadable PDF file.

 

 

posted by Roger W. Smith

“Denies U.S. Recognition Will Bring Soviet Trade” (article by Sorokin, Washington Post, 1922)

 

‘Denies U. S. Recognition Will Bring Soviet Trade’ (by Sorokin) – Washington Post 4-26-1925

 

333 ‘Denies U. S. Recognition Will Bring Soviet Trade’ (by Sorokin) – Washington Post 4-26-1925

 

Denies U.S. Recognition Will Bring Soviet Trade

By Pitirim Sorokin

The Washington Post

April 26, 1925, pg. 3

 

The entire article is posted (above) as a PDF file and in my own transcription as a Word document.

 

posted by Roger W. Smith

“Winchester Hillside Aglow With Azaleas, Grown by Harvard Professor”

 

 

‘Winchester Hillside Aglow with Azaleas’ – Boston Globe 5-23-1954

 

 

Posted here (above) as a PDF file:

“Winchester Hillside Aglow With Azaleas, Grown by Harvard Professor,” by George Talomis, Boston Globe, May 23, 1954, pg. A32

An article about Sorokin’s famous garden in his yard in Winchester, Massachusetts.

 

 

posted by Roger W. Smith