“Professor Sorokine To Remain in U.S.”

 

 

Professor Sorokine To Remain in U.S.

 

The present Russian government has extended a formal invitation to Professor Pitirim Sorokine, who is a guest of President [Henry Noble] MacCracken at Vassar College at present, to return to that country and take up once more the editorship of the Russian Peasant Magazine, which he carried on before his condemnation.

Professor Sorokine says that he is not planning to accept this invitation because he believes that a faction would have him arrested if he refused to subscribe to their opinions. In addition he would be obliged to aid in the public instruction under the communist government, which would not be pleasant. He said Wednesday:

“If the imprisonment of Trotsky by the communists, announced today, is true, I believe that the present Russian government is doomed and that its fall will take place in a short time.”

 

Poughkeepsie Eagle-News (Poughkeepsie, New York), January 17, 1924, pg. 6

“Mrs. Pitirim Sorokine on Way to This Country Now”

 

 

Those who became friends of Dr. Pitirim Sorokine during his brief stay in Decatur Friday will be interested to know that he left for New York that evening to meet Mrs. Sorokine, who is coming on a steamship [the Belgenland from Cherbourg, France; it arrived in New York City on March 28, 1924] from Russia within the next day or two. Dr. Sorokine was banished from Russia two years ago. and this will be their first meeting since that time. *

Mrs. Sorokine, like her husband, is a member of the intelligentsia. She is a botanist of considerable reputation.

While in this country. Dr. Sorokine has been seeing to the publication of a book by the Dutton Co., and now has another in preparation, to be brought out by Lippincott’s under the editorship of Dr. [Edward C.] Hayes of the University of Illinois. In addition, he is doing considerable lecturing. He expects to be at the University of Missouri before long, and to pass the summer with Mrs. Sorokine, at the University of Minnesota.

 

— Mrs. Pitirim Sorokine on Way to This Country Now,” The Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois), Sunday, March 23, 1924, pg. 17

 

* This was not accurate, since the Sorokins emigrated together from Russia upon Pitirim Sorokin’s expulsion and settled together in Prague before Pitirim Sorokin left Czechoslovakia for the United States. And, when Sorokin made his visit, he had not made a decision, at that time, not to return to Czechoslovakia. Over time, his reception in the United States, among other considerations, induced him to remain there. The Sorokins became U.S. citizens in 1930, when they were residing in Minnesota.

 

 

 

 

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Elena Petrovna Sorokina (née Baratynskaya; 1894–1975) was, as noted above, a botanist. Her scientific papers were published under the name Helen P. Sorokin.

 

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

   May 2019

“Dr. Sorokine Is Guest of English Club at Luncheon” (an early glimpse of Sorokin the exile)

 

 

Dr. Pitirim Sorokine, professor in the University of Petrograd, who spoke twice in Millikin auditorium Friday, was guest of honor at a luncheon in the Yellow Lantern at 12:30, given by the English club of the university.

Following luncheon, Dr. Sorokine spoke briefly and humorously on his personal experiences. He characterized himself as the son of a Russian laborer and of the daughter of a peasant, and said his experiences therefore were not the experiences of the nobility; that, in fact, he knew nothing of that side of Russian life.

He had what is apparently the fate of all educated Russians. He was condemned to death, but escaped and went to Prague on the invitation of President Masaryk of Czechoslovakia, a personal friend of Dr. Sorokine’s. He remained there 11 months, and then came to America, where he declares he thinks he will stay.

“I have always been an admirer of your country,” he said, “more so than ever now that I know you intimately instead of from across the sea. I was glad when some of your universities asked me to come to speak to their classes.”

Dr. Sorokine is the house guest of Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Smith while in Decatur.

 

— “Dr. Sorokine Is Guest of English Club at Luncheon; Millikin Lecturer Being Entertained in W. W. Smith Home.” Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois), Saturday, March 22, 1924, pg. 8

 

 

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Millikin University is a private university in Decatur, Illinois. It was founded in 1901 by prominent Decatur businessman James Millikin and is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA).

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

   May 2019

 

“Almost Any Catastrophe Would Fit Into Harvard Professor’s Thesis”

 

 

‘almost any catastrophe would fit into Harvard’ prof’s thesis’ – Balt Sun 10-2-1935

 

 

He Told Us So

Almost Any Catastrophe Would Fit Into Harvard Professor’s Thesis

By U. P. Ives

The Baltimore Sun, October 2, 1939, pg. 8

 

 

Full article posted above as a downloadable PDF file.

“Denies U.S. Recognition Will Bring Soviet Trade” (article by Sorokin, Washington Post, 1922)

 

 

article by Sorokin – Wash Post 4-26-1925

 

 

Denies U.S. Recognition Will Bring Soviet Trade

Kerensky’s Former Secretary Shows Russia Was Never Big Customer Here.

Recognized by Berlin, German Figures Fall.

Data Reveal that Diplomatic Intercourse Has Little Bearing on Business.

America, Now Second in List of Concessions, Existing Mainly on Paper.

Of Little Value Now; Less in the Future.

Will Be Repudiated, Thinks Prof. Sorokin, By Next Russian Regime.

 

By Pitirim Sorokin, Professor of Sociology, University of Minnesota, and Former Private Secretary of the Russian Prime Minister Kerenksy.

The Washington Post, Apr 26, 1925, pg. E3

 

 

PITIRIM O. [sic] SOROKIN, professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota, left Russia in October, 1922. Before the Russian revolution, he was a member of the social revolutionary party in Russia. He has been arrested three times by agents of the czar, and later as many times by the communist rulers.

While professor sociology in the University of Petrograd, he was also editor of the newspaper “Will of the People.” During the revolution, he was one of the organizers and a member of the executive committee of the first all-Russian peasants soviet, a member of the council of the republic and of the constitutional assembly, in addition to being private secretary to Prime Minister Kerensky.

 

 

The entire article is posted (above) as a downloadable PDF file.

“Winchester Hillside Aglow With Azaleas, Grown by Harvard Professor”

 

 

‘Winchester Hillside Aglow with Azaleas’ – Boston Globe 5-23-1954

 

 

Posted here (above) as a PDF file:

“Winchester Hillside Aglow With Azaleas, Grown by Harvard Professor,” by George Talomis, Boston Globe, May 23, 1954, pg. A32

An article about Sorokin’s famous garden in his yard in Winchester, Massachusetts.

 

 

“Creative Calamity” (editorial re Sorokin)

 

 

‘Creative Calamnity’ (editorial) – Wash Post 11-2-1942

 

 

posted here (above) as a PDF file:

“Creative Calamity” (editorial), The Washington Post, November 2, 1942, pg. 10

It discusses Sorokin’s views with reference to his The Crisis of Our Age and Man and Society in Calamity.