“Mrs. Pitirim Sorokine on Way to This Country Now”

 

 

Those who became friends of Dr. Pitirim Sorokine during his brief stay in Decatur Friday will be interested to know that he left for New York that evening to meet Mrs. Sorokine, who is coming on a steamship [the Belgenland from Cherbourg, France; it arrived in New York City on March 28, 1924] from Russia within the next day or two. Dr. Sorokine was banished from Russia two years ago. and this will be their first meeting since that time. *

Mrs. Sorokine, like her husband, is a member of the intelligentsia. She is a botanist of considerable reputation.

While in this country. Dr. Sorokine has been seeing to the publication of a book by the Dutton Co., and now has another in preparation, to be brought out by Lippincott’s under the editorship of Dr. [Edward C.] Hayes of the University of Illinois. In addition, he is doing considerable lecturing. He expects to be at the University of Missouri before long, and to pass the summer with Mrs. Sorokine, at the University of Minnesota.

 

— Mrs. Pitirim Sorokine on Way to This Country Now,” The Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois), Sunday, March 23, 1924, pg. 17

 

* This was not accurate, since the Sorokins emigrated together from Russia upon Pitirim Sorokin’s expulsion and settled together in Prague before Pitirim Sorokin left Czechoslovakia for the United States. And, when Sorokin made his visit, he had not made a decision, at that time, not to return to Czechoslovakia. Over time, his reception in the United States, among other considerations, induced him to remain there. The Sorokins became U.S. citizens in 1930, when they were residing in Minnesota.

 

 

 

 

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Elena Petrovna Sorokina (née Baratynskaya; 1894–1975) was, as noted above, a botanist. Her scientific papers were published under the name Helen P. Sorokin.

 

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

   May 2019

“Dr. Sorokine Is Guest of English Club at Luncheon” (an early glimpse of Sorokin the exile)

 

Dr. Pitirim Sorokine, professor in the University of Petrograd, who spoke twice in Millikin auditorium Friday, was guest of honor at a luncheon in the Yellow Lantern at 12:30, given by the English club of the university.

Following luncheon, Dr. Sorokine spoke briefly and humorously on his personal experiences. He characterized himself as the son of a Russian laborer and of the daughter of a peasant, and said his experiences therefore were not the experiences of the nobility; that, in fact, he knew nothing of that side of Russian life.

He had what is apparently the fate of all educated Russians. He was condemned to death, but escaped and went to Prague on the invitation of President Masaryk of Czechoslovakia, a personal friend of Dr. Sorokine’s. He remained there 11 months, and then came to America, where he declares he thinks he will stay.

“I have always been an admirer of your country,” he said, “more so than ever now that I know you intimately instead of from across the sea. I was glad when some of your universities asked me to come to speak to their classes.”

Dr. Sorokine is the house guest of Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Smith while in Decatur.

 

— “Dr. Sorokine Is Guest of English Club at Luncheon; Millikin Lecturer Being Entertained in W. W. Smith Home,” Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois), Saturday, March 22, 1924, pg. 8

 

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Millikin University is a private university in Decatur, Illinois. It was founded in 1901 by prominent Decatur businessman James Millikin and is affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA).

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

    May 2019

“Almost Any Catastrophe Would Fit Into Harvard Professor’s Thesis”

 

‘almost any catastrophe would fit into Harvard’ prof’s thesis’ – Balt Sun 10-2-1935

 

He Told Us So

Almost Any Catastrophe Would Fit Into Harvard Professor’s Thesis

By U. P. Ives

The Baltimore Sun, October 2, 1939, pg. 8

 

Full article posted above as a downloadable PDF file.

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

     March 2018

“Sees Peasant Rule Redeeming Russia” (Pitirim A. Sorokin)

 

‘Sees Peasant Role Redeeming Russia’ – NY Times 1-27-1924

 

“Sees Peasant Rule Redeeming Russia” (Pitirim A. Sorokin)

The New York Times

January 27, 1924

 

This very interesting article, quoting the views of the exiled Russian sociologist Pitirim A. Sorokin, is posted above as a downloadable PDF file.

 

— Roger W. Smith

     December 2017

Sorokin reunited with Kerensky

 

‘Colleagues of Revolution Meet in Boston’ (Kerensky, Sorokin) – Christian Sci Monitor

 

The Russian American sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin (1889-1968), an ardent opponent of Communism, but an early supporter of the Russian Revolution, served during the Russian Revolution as secretary to Prime Minister Alexander Kerensky, who was a leader in the Russian Constituent Assembly.

After the October Revolution, Sorokin continued to fight communist leaders, and was arrested by the Bolshevik regime several times before he was eventually condemned to death. After six weeks in prison, he was set free and went back to teaching at the University of St. Petersburg. In 1918, he went on to become the founder of the sociology department at the University of St. Petersburg. In 1922, Sorokin was again arrested and this time exiled by the Soviet government. He emigrated in 1923 to the United States and was naturalized in 1930. Sorokin was professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota (1924–30) and at Harvard University (1930–59).

Attached here (above) as a downloadable PDF file is an article from the Christian Science Monitor of March 9, 1938. The article describes a meeting in Boston between Sorokin and Kerensky, who were reunited.

 

— Roger W. Smith

     September 2017

“Professor Softens in His Hatred of Reds”

 

‘Sorokin Softens in Hatred of Reds’ – Chi Tribune 4-3-1949

 

Posted here (above) as a downloadable PDF file is an article based on an extremely informative and revealing interview — the article is notable for its accuracy — with Russian American sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin (1889-1968).

“Professor Softens in His Hatred of Reds,” by Eugene Griffin, Chicago Daily Tribune, April 3, 1949

The Chicago Daily Tribune was a conservative newspaper with an anti-Communist slant.

 

— Roger W. Smith

     September 2017