the Sorokins and Russian War Relief

 

‘Town Rallies Behind War Relief’ – Winchester Chronicle

 

75 years ago: Town rallies behind Russian War Relief

By Ellen Knight

The Daily Times Chronicle (Winchester, MA)

June 13, 2017

http://homenewshere.com/daily_times_chronicle/news/winchester/article_38566ea6-5046-11e7-ada0-6fa227eccafc.html

 

 

Russian benefit – Boston Globe 12-15-1941

 

 

– posted by Roger W. Smith

     September 2021

 

Mrs. Sorokine on Way to This Country Now

 

 

 

Posted here:

“Mrs. Pitirim Sorokine on Way to This Country Now”

Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois)

March 23, 1924

pg. 17

 

 

– posted by Roger W. Smith

     August 2021

a rare Sorokin photo

 

 

 

 

Sorokin and family, presumably in Winchester, Massachusetts, 1930s

I have not seen this photo before.

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

May 2021

 

 

Sorokin and Elena (a favorite Sorokin photo of mine)

 

 

 

Sorokin adjusted-

 

Питирим и Елена Сорокины. 1921 г., Тамбов (рядом с Еленой – предположительно ее сводный брат, второй справа – ее отец)

 

Pitirim and Elena Sorokina. 1921, Tambov (next to Elena – presumably her half-brother; her father is second from the right)

 

The photo was taken the year before Sorokin was exiled from Russia. His wife left to join him in the United States in 1924.

 

 

posted by Roger W. Smith

   April 2020

“Mrs. Pitirim Sorokine on Way to This Country Now”

 

 

Those who became friends of Dr. Pitirim Sorokine during his brief stay in Decatur Friday will be interested to know that he left for New York that evening to meet Mrs. Sorokine, who is coming on a steamship [the Belgenland from Cherbourg, France; it arrived in New York City on March 28, 1924] from Russia within the next day or two. Dr. Sorokine was banished from Russia two years ago. and this will be their first meeting since that time. *

Mrs. Sorokine, like her husband, is a member of the intelligentsia. She is a botanist of considerable reputation.

While in this country. Dr. Sorokine has been seeing to the publication of a book by the Dutton Co., and now has another in preparation, to be brought out by Lippincott’s under the editorship of Dr. [Edward C.] Hayes of the University of Illinois. In addition, he is doing considerable lecturing. He expects to be at the University of Missouri before long, and to pass the summer with Mrs. Sorokine, at the University of Minnesota.

 

— Mrs. Pitirim Sorokine on Way to This Country Now,” The Decatur Herald (Decatur, Illinois), Sunday, March 23, 1924, pg. 17

 

* This was not accurate, since the Sorokins emigrated together from Russia upon Pitirim Sorokin’s expulsion and settled together in Prague before Pitirim Sorokin left Czechoslovakia for the United States. And, when Sorokin made his visit, he had not made a decision, at that time, not to return to Czechoslovakia. Over time, his reception in the United States, among other considerations, induced him to remain there. The Sorokins became U.S. citizens in 1930, when they were residing in Minnesota.

 

 

 

 

*****************************************************
Elena Petrovna Sorokina (née Baratynskaya; 1894–1975) was, as noted above, a botanist. Her scientific papers were published under the name Helen P. Sorokin.

 

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

   May 2019

Elena Sorokin, “My Life with Pitirim Sorokin”

 

 

 

elena-sorokin-my-life-with-pitirim-sorokin

 

 

 

Elena P. Sorokin, “My Life with Pitirim Sorokin,” International Journal of Contemporary Sociology, January & April 1975, nos. 1 & 2.

The full text of this article is posted here (above). The article provides fascinating details regarding the life of Sorokin and his wife in Russia shorty before they emigrated to the United States.

 

 

— posted by Roger W. Smith

Sergei P. Sorokin, “Life with Pitirim Sorokin: A Younger Son’s Perspective”

 

Sergei P. Sorokin, ‘Life with Pitirim Sorokin; A Younger Son’s Perspective’

posted here (Word document above):

Sergei P. Sorokin, “Life With Pitirim Sorokin: A Younger Son’s Perspective”

how did Sorokin’s “Hunger as a Factor in Human Affairs” get published?

 

 

Pitirim A. Sorokin’s lifelong friend and fellow academic Carle C. Zimmerman, with whom Sorokin taught for many years, states in his Sorokin: The World’s Greatest Sociologist: His Life and Ideas on Social Time and Change (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada: University of Saskatchewan, 1968, pg. xiii-xiv), regarding Sorokin’s groundbreaking study голод как фактор (golod kak faktor; published in English as Hunger as a Factor in Human Affairs):

After the famine of 1921, … [Sorokin] embarked upon a study of the sociology of hunger and famine. The communist government had killed the landowners and tried to collectivize the peasants. As a result of this, agricultural production declined to disastrously low levels. A former grain exporting country could no longer feed itself. A drought in 1920 and 1921 resulted in wholesale starvation. Millions died of famine. Sorokin’s book about this was too much for the communists. His manuscript was destroyed and he accepted banishment September 23, 1922 to save his life.

This statement is misleading. The book was published in Leningrad in 1922. Soviet censors immediately destroyed it. It is easy to see why. Sorokin’s study was written in the midst of, and in response to, the Russian famine of 1921–22. It shows how the government in power can create such conditions.

In the introduction to the English translation by Sorokin’s wife, Elena P. Sorokin, which was published in 1975 as Hunger as a Factor in Human Affairs, Elena Sorokin notes that “The censors … caught up with the book in its final stage of production and destroyed it. When Pitirim and I were banished from the USSR …, we smuggled out the proofs of the book.” It was published posthumously, as noted above, in a translation by Sorokin’s wife.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   December 2017

 

 

*****************************************************

 

 

 

 

title-page-golod-kak-faktor.jpg

 

 

title-page-hunger-as-a-factor-in-human-affairs.jpg

 

 

 

 

photographs of Pitirim A. Sorokin and his wife, Elena P. Sorokin

 

 

1-pitirim-a-sorokin-in-1917.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2-elena-sorokin-1917

 

 

3-sorokin-with-his-wife-and-her-family-in-tambov-russia

 

 

 

4-sorokin-lecturing-at-harvard

 

 

 

 

6-sorokin-vacationing-lake-memphremagog-canada.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5-sorokin-at-his-writing-desk-winchester-ma

 

 

7-pitirim-a-sorokin1

 

8-pitirim-a-sorokin 2