how did Sorokin’s “Hunger as a Factor in Human Affairs” get published?

 

 

Pitirim A. Sorokin’s lifelong friend and fellow academic Carle C. Zimmerman, with whom Sorokin taught for many years, states in his Sorokin: The World’s Greatest Sociologist: His Life and Ideas on Social Time and Change (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada: University of Saskatchewan, 1968, pg. xiii-xiv), regarding Sorokin’s groundbreaking study голод как фактор (golod kak faktor; published in English as Hunger as a Factor in Human Affairs):

After the famine of 1921, … [Sorokin] embarked upon a study of the sociology of hunger and famine. The communist government had killed the landowners and tried to collectivize the peasants. As a result of this, agricultural production declined to disastrously low levels. A former grain exporting country could no longer feed itself. A drought in 1920 and 1921 resulted in wholesale starvation. Millions died of famine. Sorokin’s book about this was too much for the communists. His manuscript was destroyed and he accepted banishment September 23, 1922 to save his life.
This statement is misleading. The book was published in Leningrad in 1922. Soviet censors immediately destroyed it. It is easy to see why. Sorokin’s study was written in the midst of, and in response to, the Russian famine of 1921–22. It shows how the government in power can create such conditions.

In the introduction to the English translation by Sorokin’s wife, Elena P. Sorokin, which was published in 1975 as Hunger as a Factor in Human Affairs, Elena Sorokin notes that “The censors … caught up with the book in its final stage of production and destroyed it. When Pitirim and I were banished from the USSR …, we smuggled out the proofs of the book.” It was published posthumously, as noted above, in a translation by Sorokin’s wife.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   December 2017

 

 

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title-page-golod-kak-faktor.jpg

 

 

title-page-hunger-as-a-factor-in-human-affairs.jpg

 

 

 

 

“Sorokin”(«Сорокин»)

 

 

 

Sorokin post final – English, Russian

 

 

 

My essay about the Russian-American sociologist Pitirim A. Sorokin which follows is approximately 4,000 words long. It is posed here as a downloadable Word document, which contains the text of the essay in both English and Russian.

 

 — Roger W. Smith 

    December 2017

 

 

Мой очерк о российско-американском социологе Питириме А. Сорокине, о котором идет речь, составляет около 4000 слов. Он представлен здесь как загружаемый документ Word, который содержит текст эссе на английском и русском языках.

 

— Роджер У. Смит

  Декабрь 2017 года

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 — is available below. (Scroll down past Russian translation to bottom.)

 

 

 

my Sorokin books

 

 

my Sorokin books

 

 

The attached Word document (above) contains an inventory of books by and about the Russian-American sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim Alexandrovich Sorokin (1889-1968) in my personal home library.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

    October 2017

Pitirim Sorokin, “Lenin the Destroyer”

 

 

Sorokin, ‘Was Lenin a Failure’ – Forum 1924

 

Posted here (above) as a downloadable PDF file is an article by the Russian-American sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin.

The article was written shortly after Sorokin was banished from Russia and exiled by the Bolshevik regime.

Pitirim Sorokin, “Was Lenin a Failure?–A Debate: I–Lenin the Destroyer,” Forum, vol. LXXI, no. 4 (April 1924)

 

— Roger W. Smith

   September 2017

 

 

a bitter exchange

 

Crane Brinton, ‘Socio-Astrology’

 

‘Historionics’ (Sorkin Reply to Crane Brinton)

 

 

 

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A remarkable exchange between Harvard history professor Crane Brinton and Pitirim A. Sorokin, then chairman of Harvard’s Department of Sociology, occurred in 1937 and 1938 in the pages of The Southern Review, a respected journal. That it appeared in The Southern Review, a literary journal, rather than a journal devoted to history or sociology, is noticeable.

Professor Brinton’s article comprised as an appraisal of the first three volumes of Sorokin’s magnum opus, Social and Cultural Dynamics. It was not a standard review, by any means; it was, in fact an essay-review. It was over twenty pages long. Professor Sorokin’s rejoinder was about ten pages long.

Brinton attacks Sorokin with no holds barred, criticizing everything from the methodology and assumptions underlying the work to what he views as Sorokin’s atrocious prose style. Sorokin, clearly stung by the review, responded with a strenuous defense of his work in which he seemed at times to be on the defensive and in other sections of his rejoinder essay tried to even the score with a vigorous counterattack.

The two articles are posted above as downloadable PDF files.

Crane Brinton, Socio-Astrology, The Southern Review, vol. 3 (fall 1937), pp. 243-266

Pitirim A. Sorokin, “Histrionics,” The Southern Review, vol. 3 (winter 1938), pp. 554-564

 

— Roger W. Smith

   August 2017