reviews of “Hunger as a Factor in Human Affairs” by Pitirim A. Sorokin

 

 

Robert Bierstedt review of ‘Hunger as a Factor’ – Social Forces

 

Carle C. Zimmerman review of ‘Hunger as a Factor’ – Social Science

 

 

 

In my post about the Russian-American sociologist Pitirim A. Sorokin, at

“Sorokin”(«Сорокин»)

I stressed the originality and importance of Sorokin’s book Hunger as a Factor in Human Affairs, which I feel deserves to be better known.

Posted here are two reviews of the book which discuss its merits and the circumstances under which it was written and published:

review of Hunger as a Factor in Human Affairs by Robert Bierstedt, Social Forces, Vol. 55, No. 1 (Sep., 1976), pp. 195-196

review of Hunger as A Factor in Human Affairs by Carle C. Zimmerman, Social Science, Vol. 51, No. 2 (Spring 1976), Pp. 113-114

 

 

Robert Bierstedt (1913–1998) was a student of Sorokin’s who became a leading American sociologist. He headed the department of sociology at City College of New York and at New York University before becoming emeritus professor of sociology at the University of Virginia.

 

Carle C. Zimmerman (1897-1983) was a longtime colleague of Sorokin’s at the University of Minnesota and Harvard University.

 

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   December 2017

“Pitirim A. Sorokin: Prophet of Western decline … and restoration”

 

 

Fr. James Thornton, ‘Sorokin; Prophet of Western decline & restoration’

Posted here (above) as a downloadable PDF file is the following article:

 

Fr. James Thornton, “Pitirim A. Sorokin: Prophet of Western decline … and restoration,” The New American, October 18, 1993, pp. 23-29

 

— Roger W. Smith

 

 

 

Sorokin reunited with Kerensky

 

 

‘Colleagues of Revolution Meet in Boston’ (Kerensky, Sorokin) – Christian Sci Monitor

 

 

The Russian American sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin (1889-1968), an ardent opponent of Communism, but an early supporter of the Russian Revolution, served during the Russian Revolution as secretary to Prime Minister Alexander Kerensky, who was a leader in the Russian Constituent Assembly.

After the October Revolution, Sorokin continued to fight communist leaders, and was arrested by the Bolshevik regime several times before he was eventually condemned to death. After six weeks in prison, he was set free and went back to teaching at the University of St. Petersburg. In 1918, he went on to become the founder of the sociology department at the University of St. Petersburg. In 1922, Sorokin was again arrested and this time exiled by the Soviet government. He emigrated in 1923 to the United States and was naturalized in 1930. Sorokin was professor of sociology at the University of Minnesota (1924–30) and at Harvard University (1930–59).

Attached here (above) as a downloadable PDF file is an article from the Christian Science Monitor of March 9, 1938. The article describes a meeting in Boston between Sorokin and Kerensky, who were reunited.

 

— Roger W. Smith

    September 2017

Carle C. Zimmerman, “In Memoriam: Pitirim Aleksanderovich Sorokin”

 

 

Carle C. Zimmerman, ‘In Memoriam; Pitirim Alexanderovich Sorokin’

 

 

The memorial tribute to the Russian-American sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin (1889-1968) which is posted above as a downloadable PDF file appeared in Carle C. Zimmerman, Sorokin: The World’s Greatest Sociologist: His Life and Ideas on Social Time and Change. The tribute provides a brief biography of Sorokin.

Carle C. Zimmerman was a lifelong friend and fellow academic of Sorokin.

Carle C. Zimmerman, “In Memoriam: Pitirim Aleksanderovich Sorokin,” in Sorokin: The World’s Greatest Sociologist: His Life and Ideas on Social Time and Change (Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada: University of Saskatchewan, 1968), pg. xiii-xiv

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   August 2017

 

“Sorokin in Review”

 

 

 

William T. Liu, ‘Sorokin in Review’ – The Review of Politics 1966

 

 

This seminal article on the Russian American sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin appeared in The Review of Politics in January 1966. Ostensibly a review of Sorokin’s autobiography, A Long Journey, which had just been published, the article is actually an assessment of Sorokin’s life, career, and oeuvre. It addresses controversies going on at the time which involved a defense of Sorokin being undertaken by renowned sociologists, and in which there was controversy over how theoretical as opposed to empirical sociology should be.

The article is posted above as downloadable PDF file.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

   September 2017

 

 

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William T. Liu, “Sorokin in Review,” The Review of Politics, 28:1 (January 1966), pp. 99-105.

 

Pitrim A. Sorokin residence

 

 

‘Winchester garden aglow with azaleas’ – Boston Globe

 

 

On May 24, 2017, I traveled by car to Winchester, Massachusetts, where the world famous Russian émigré sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin, one of my heroes, lived.

Sorokin, his wife Elena P.  Sorokin, and their two sons resided at 8 Cliff Street in Winchester. (Sorokin died in 1968. One of his sons still occupies the same residence.) I was interested not only to see the residence of a world renowned scholar and writer, but also to see the house because it was famous for its grounds: a garden developed and maintained by Sorokin himself, for which he had won awards from horticultural societies and of which he was proud.

I drove up the block, which was on a steep ascent, using GPS to guide me. The GPS system advised me that I had arrived at my destination, 8 Cliff Street, on my left. I saw 6 Cliff Street, but where was number 8? Number 8 was shrouded and hidden by a profusion of flowering bushes. It reminded me of the Forest of Thorns in “Sleeping Beauty.”

 

— Roger W. Smith

 

 

 

 

Pitirim A. Sorokin residence, 8 Cliff St., Winchester, MA. Photographs by Roger W. Smith.

 

 

“Professor Softens in His Hatred of Reds”

 

 

‘Sorokin Softens in Hatred of Reds’ – Chi Tribune 4-3-1949

 

 

Posted here (above) as a downloadable PDF file is an article based on an extremely informative and revealing interview — the article is notable for its accuracy — with Russian American sociologist and social philosopher Pitirim A. Sorokin (1889-1968).

“Professor Softens in His Hatred of Reds,” by Eugene Griffin, Chicago Daily Tribune, April 3, 1949

 

The Chicago Daily Tribune was a conservative newspaper with an anti-Communist slant.

 

 

— Roger W. Smith

    September 2017